Orchestra

What is an Orchestra?

An orchestra is a group of musicians that can vary in size from 25 to over 100. They are made up of different sections of instruments:  String, woodwind, brass and percussion.

There are different types of orchestras.  Chamber, Symphony and Philharmonic.

The word orchestra comes from ancient Greek and used to mean the circular front part of the stage where the chorus was.

Different sections are made of the following instruments. The number of each instrument will vary depending on orchestra or composition.

String

3 violins of different sizes

  • Violin
  • Viola
  • Cello
  • Double Bass
Woodwind

clarinet

  • Clarinets
  • Oboe
  • Flute
  • Bassoons
  • Piccolo
  • Saxophone
Brass

french horn

  • Horns
  • Trumpet
  • Trombone
  • Tuba
Percussion

timpani drums

  • Timpani
  • Percussion
  • Harp
  • Keyboards
Choir

choir in church

 

 

 

 

 

*Featured image by Derek Gleeson via wikimedia commons

* Images in order -Stilfehler via wikimedia common, theclassicalnovice, theclassicalnovice, sheila miguez via wikimedia commons, Glogger via wikimedia commons,

 

 

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Symphony Orchestra

What is a symphony orchestra? A symphony orchestra is a large orchestra of is a large orchestra of over 50 musicians. Sometimes they can have over 100 musicians.

Chamber Orchestra

What is a chamber orchestra? A chamber orchestra is a small orchestra – up to 50 musicians, but usually fewer. It’s possible for the whole orchestra to only play string instruments.

Philharmonic Orchestra

What is a philharmonic orchestra? A philharmonic orchestra is a large orchestra of over 50 musicians. Sometimes they can have over 100 musicians.

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